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Courses

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS

 

Fall 2020

HIST 7306: Women and the Holocaust

This course aims to explore topics related to women’s experience during the Holocaust. Through the study of a variety of primary sources, online archives, literary texts, and artistic representations, students will gain a multifaceted view of this topic, which merges the field of Holocaust Studies and Gender Studies. This course will analyze women’s lives in the ghettos and in concentration camps, including specific experiences of abuse as well as resistance.

Fall 2020

LIT 3337: Literature & Dictatorship in Latin America

This course will focus on literary works written during the various Latin American dictatorships of the twentieth century. Through a comparative approach, students will learn about writers, poets, and artists whose works were censored, published in exile, or used as tools of resistance against the military dictatorships. Students will analyze literary and artistic works while learning about the historical, socio-political circumstances that influenced their creation.

Spring 2020

HIST 4V71: Women in the Holocaust

This independent study course focuses on discussing topics related to Jewish women’s experience during the Holocaust such as hunger, reproductive matters, motherhood, sexual abuse, resistance, and more. Through a variety of texts and sources the student will gain a multifaceted view of this important subject.

Spring 2020

HUHI 7314: Fascism in Marseille, Spain & Lisbon

The history of World War II is often studied from the perspective of the larger European urban centers. Less studied are the routes that allowed refugees to escape. Marseille and Lisbon, port cities placed on the edges of Europe, played particular roles in the history of European refugees from the Third Reich, the Spanish Civil War and World War II. The course examines the experience and flight of refugees as victims of violent conflicts and as agents of change at their places of destination. To better comprehend the Holocaust from the periphery, this course analyses a number of different sources that examine and explore trajectories, trends, and tribulations of refugees. The important role of aid organizations and institutions will also be analyzed and students will gain hands-on experience in conducting online research in the archives. The artistic productions and expressions associated with the experience of being displaced during World War II will also be explored for us to gain a more in-depth meaning of what it meant to the refugees to be at the very edge of Europe with slims chances of crossing the Atlantic.

Spring 2020

ARHM 3342: Refugees, Exile & Human Rights

The history of humanity is made up of global migrations and movements of people. For some scholars there existed no refugee problem until the emergence of fixed and closed state borders of the modern age. Others argue that people have been uprooted and temporarily homeless throughout history. Labels and concepts that attempt to define migrants usually do so from a hegemonic perspective attached to legalistic frameworks. Such attempts to categorize people in movement include racializing mechanisms, and constantly ignoring the individual perspectives of the migrants, which may include reasons for fleeing a country, social class, education, religion, and political affiliations. This course explores specific moments in history where migrants, refugees, exiles were forced to be on the move, to better understand changes and differences in the history of refugees. How do we define refugees? What forces them to leave their place of birth? What does homeless mean and how does it manifest itself in their lives and cultures? Why do refugees become stigmatized? In addition to learning about the history of refugees, this course will also examine creative works of art, literature, and poetry of refugees and about the exile. This course is co-taught by three professors.

Spring 2020

LIT 3337: Latin American Exile

Exile is one of the most prominent phenomena of the twentieth century to have influenced world literature and art in profound ways. In this course, we examine questions such as:  How do writers and artists define exile? How does exile define them? More specifically, what impact did the experience of exile have on Latin American literature? We explore and discuss literary works written in exile or about exile by refugees who were forced to flee from their countries of origin. How does exile or homelessness manifests itself in their creative works? This course explores the connections between different national literatures and disciplines during three specific historical periods of social, political, economic, and human crisis during the Spanish Civil War, World War II, and the Latin American Military Dictatorships. The connections between these works of literature are interdisciplinary, comparative, thematic, and historical. We will read, analyze, and discuss essays, literary articles, poetry, fiction and nonfiction novels that help to shed light on this topic.

Fall 2019

LIT 3337: Literature Under Dictatorship

This course explores twentieth-century Latin American Literature that deals with the topic of life under military dictatorships. Focusing specifically on works written by authors directly affected by state-sanctioned violence in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Guatemala, and others, students will examine historical and socio-political circumstances that impacted the lives and memories of these writers. Some of the literature will also draw on the memories of Jewish immigrants, or Latin Americans of Jewish origins, and address how these became special targets for the various military dictatorships. The questions raised about the desaparecidos and memory of the dictatorship years will be based on an interdisciplinary approach drawing comparisons between different Latin American countries and systems as portrayed in literature and poetry.

Fall 2019

HIST 4359: The Holocaust & Human Rights in Latin America

This course will explore the Holocaust as the paradigmatic case of violation of all human rights, which resulted in the historic UN Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. With a focus in Latin America, this course will examine the history of military dictatorships and oppressive regimes, genocide, and other human rights violations throughout the twentieth-century. This course will discuss and analyze representations of recalling of violence in literature, film, and memoirs by survivors of the dictatorships in Latin America, specifically in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and the special case of Mexico. Students will search and identify multiple human rights violations which occurred during and after the drafting of the Declaration, in Latin American countries in the later part of the twentieth-century. This course is co-taught by three professors.

Fall 2019

HIST 2370: The Holocaust

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the Holocaust and its aftermath. It challenges our fundamental assumptions and values, and it raises questions of great urgency: “What was the background of the Holocaust?” “How was it possible for a state to systematize, mechanize, and socially organize this assault on the Jewish people?” And “How could the Nazis in a few years eliminate the foundations of Western civilization?” The course will search for answers to these questions and investigate many others. In addition, it will explore the ways in which the Holocaust is often represented in survivor testimonies, literature, films, museums, sites of remembrance, and in new media. This course is co-taught by three professors.

Spring 2019

HIST 4359: The Holocaust and Human Rights in Latin America

This course explores the Holocaust as the paradigmatic case of violation of all human rights, which resulted in the historic UN Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. With a focus in Latin America, this course examines the history of military dictatorships and oppressive regimes, genocide, and other human rights violations throughout the twentieth-century. This course discusses and analyzes representations of recalling of violence in literature, film, and memoirs by survivors of the dictatorships in Latin America, specifically in Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and the special case of Mexico. Students will search and identify multiple human rights violations which occurred during and after the drafting of the Declaration, in Latin American countries in the later part of the twentieth-century. This course is co-taught by three professors.

The University of Texas at Dallas

800 W. Campbell Rd. JO31,

Richardson, TX 75080

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©2020 by Dr. Sarah R. Valente